Cable & Wireless hires Elmwood to create new identity

LONDON - Global telecommunications brand Cable & Wireless Communications has unveiled a new brand identity, following its demerger from Cable & Wireless Worldwide.

New identity: the Cable & Wireless Communications logo
New identity: the Cable & Wireless Communications logo

The two businesses split last week, listing as separate companies on the London Stock Exchange, with the Worldwide division set to focus on corporate telecoms services.

Cable & Wireless Communications, which owns 38 telecoms businesses across the world, hired branding agency Elmwood to create an identity for the new company, moving away from the traditional globe icon.

The new three-dimensional logo features cables forming the shape of the ampersand in the brand's name. Elmwood has also created a new company website, brand guidelines and tone of voice.

"Cable & Wireless is a globally recognised brand, built up over several generations," said brand and communications director Lachlan Johnston. "Our challenge was to ensure Cable & Wireless Communications maintained the value and reputation of this brand following demerger."

Elliot Wilson, managing director at Elmwood, added: "It was a privilege to work on such an iconic brand. Elmwood had a duty of trust to uphold the history and heritage of the brand, while creating the next generation of mark and identity for them."

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